INTRODUCTIONS

You are boarding the aeroplane MGMT862 at an airport but YOU have lost your passport.

Someone in the boarding lounge has your photo and they are looking for you

There is a lot of ambiguity

Your seat in this MGMT862 aircraft has changed

When found the person with your photograph will will show you to your seat
If no one has your passport see the flight attendant Dr Gaye Greenwood

Critical focus question

How credible (trustworthy, reliable believable) are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?

More than 30 yrs ago Tichy (1983) sounded a warning
Over the past two decades billions of dollars were spent on management and organization development with the apparent intention of changing organizations. Examples are programs to implement Management By Objectives (MBO), programmed for organization development, the managerial grid, leadership courses, models for strategic planning and, more recent, quality circles. Almost none of these efforts were structurally monitored or assessed. As a result, methods to improve organizations have come and gone one after the other, and yet we are none the wiser of which methods work, which ones don’t and why. (Tichy, 1983, pp. 363)
 

Paper aim is to:
Examine the theories, concepts and best practices that managers draw on to manage the change process while being aware of external and internal stakeholder perspectives. Provide knowledge of the role of human resource management, ethics and communication for effective organisational change management.

Learning Outcomes
Critically evaluate the complexity of organisational change
Examine and apply theories, concepts and practices of leading and managing change
Analyse the role of human resource management in facilitating change management
Demonstrate the importance of ethics and communication in the change process
Establish the impact of change on individuals and their careers
Critically evaluate the outcomes of organisational change from different stakeholder perspectives

Critical focus question week 1

How credible (reliable trustworthy) are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?

Assessments

Item % of mark allocation Maximum mark Group/individual Due date

Assessment 1
Self-Reflection 40% 40 Individual Week 5

Assessment 2
Case study 40% 40 Individual Week 9

Assessment 3
Change engagement project 20% 20 Individual Week12

7

Content
Concepts, theories and practices of change including stakeholder perspectives
Leading and managing change in a global and domestic context
The role of human resource management in organisational change
Engaging support and managing resistance through the change process
The role of ethics and communication in the change process
Individual experiences of organisational change
Reviewing and evaluating the change process

Kurt Lewin (1947)

Kubler Ross (1969)

Week 9

This week we ask how can organisational change be embedded into organisations through Interest Based Negotiation (IBN)?
The Union Perspective
Case study Air New Zealand

*

Wk 1 -How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Wk2 -Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Wk 3 -Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?
Wk 4 -How, do we make sense of change and how do we respond to organisational change across the dimensions of cognition, affect and behaviour?
Wk 5-Why is it important to include perspectives of those people (stakeholders) who might be affected by the decision in the process of planning design and implementation of change?
Wk 6-How can a third-party change agent draw on a range of processes to facilitate collaborative change and embed a collaborative culture? The heatnetwork case
Wk 7 To What Extent Is Culture Change Possible Through Coaching and Mentoring?
Wk 8 What are the leadership and negotiation factors contributing to organisational change success or failure?
Wk 9 How can organisational change be embedded into organisations through an Interest Based Negotiation (IBN) approach to internal and union relationships ?

*

Outline

What is interest based negotiation?
Conflict
Thinking about our own negotiations
Stories from the front line growing union membership
Air New Zealand
Assessment discussion

*

Mary Parker Follett’s integrative or Negotiation also known as IBN

*

A problem-solving approach
Focus on commonalties rather than differences
Address needs and interests, not positions
Commit to meeting the needs of all involved parties
Exchange information and ideas
Invent options for mutual gain
Use objective criteria to set standards

3-*
Integrative or IBN Negotiation

Comparing IBN v competitive distributive Bargaining Process
(Fisher, Ury & Patton, 1999)
TRADITIONAL BARGAINING
Stated experience competitively
Identify Issues
Develop Positions
Develop Proposals
Meet to Negotiate
Argue and Justify
Demolish their Proposals
Compromise Power
Settle on Win/Lose
INTEREST BASED Negotiation Experience shared collaboratively
Identify Issues
Identify Interests
Develop Interest Statements
Meet to Discuss Interests
Identify Common Interests
Develop Options
Evaluate Options
Decide Based on SMART goals Agree or Settle on Mutual Gains
Agree to the best most satisfying option that meets the needs of stakeholders

Creating & Claiming Value
Creating Value
Claiming value
Often linked to integrative mutual gains approach
Otherwise known as win/win
Find solutions where both parties achieve their goals
Find ways to meet both parties objectives
Enlarge the pie
Identify more or differentWeek 7 Focus question

To What Extent Is Culture Change Possible Through Coaching and Mentoring?

Chapter 6

From Robert Garvey

Week 7
Recap Week 6 collaboration Culture and the third party change agent
Mentoring & coaching
Benefits of mentoring and coaching
How to mentor and coach
7 situational mentoring and coaching contexts
Present processes of mentoring and coaching for change
Why are outcomes ambiguous?

Wk 1 -How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Wk2 -Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Wk 3 -Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?
Wk 4 -How, do we make sense of change and how do we respond to organisational change across the dimensions of cognition, affect and behaviour?
Wk 5-Why is it important to include perspectives of those people (stakeholders) who might be affected by the decision in the process of planning design and implementation of change?
Wk 6-How can a third-party change agent draw on a range of processes to facilitate collaborative change and embed a collaborative culture? The heatnetwork case

Organisational Culture Textbook definitions
“A system of shared beliefs and values that guides behaviour ”
Wood et al. (2016)

“The soul of the organization”
Hellriegel & Slocum (2009)

Commonly known as…
“The way we do things around here.”

Schein’s 1990 definition
“(a) a pattern of basic assumptions,
(b) invented, discovered, or developed by a given group,
(c) as it learns to cope with its problems of external adaptation and internal integration,
(d) that has worked well enough to be considered valid and,
therefore
(e) is to be taught to new members as the
(f) correct way to perceive, think, and feel in relation to those problems.”

p.11

Organisational culture iceberg

Structure
Language
Rituals & ceremonies
Stories & legends
Values
Assumptions/beliefs

McShane, Olekalns & Travaglione, 2010

The Levels of Culture
Schein, 1990
(a) Observable artifacts – e.g. physical layout, dress code, mission statement and other documents

(b) Values – what is important
(c) Basic underlying assumptions – e.g. We are the best, we will always make profits

Factors contributing to changing organisational culture

1. Competitive pressures (e.g. may make the organisation more cost-focussed or innovative)
2. Changes in other aspects of the external environment
(Social, health COVID 19,technological, economic, political/legal)
e.g. What may change is the need to now be ‘leading edge in technology; focused on enviWEEK 4.Resistance
Cognitive, Affective and Behavioural Responses to Change
From Smollan (2006)
&
Akella, D., & Khoury, G. (2019). Resistance to Organizational Change in Academia

Review
Wk 1
How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Wk2
Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Wk 3
Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?

Stages of change and employee participation
Problem identification
Creating solution
Implementation
Payments company not clear stages but individuals had identified change they wanted and participation was unstructured
Housing development company project team led consultation process therefore changes originated from staff with staff working on problems suggesting processes and actions for implementing change
Policing Trust in knowledge of external consultants was questioned employee participation focussed on implementation –consulting on job design etc. Perceptions of a lack of equity or fairness silo views worked against the change

Breadth
Project management police –restricted range of activities, top down management breadth of participation judged low, sporadic general unclear communication about need for change and actions required, employees did not respond to managers open door policies
Lean systems housing- breadth high, broad range of participation , staff involved in problem identification, staff volunteers participated in project team, experimentation in detail staff involved in decision accelerator formal consultation on job description change and clear line manager communication during
Dialogic sensemaking payments company – moderate breadth perceived not structured nor perceived as clear by employees. Some participants unclear about the business benefits however high improvement in business performance and individual stories about business improvement led to higher employee engagement

Depth of participation involvement
Depth is quality, Involvement is employee power over decision making (Clarke & Higgs , 2019)
Employee participation at the dialogic discourse at payments company was judged to offer the greatest degree of involvement and therefore greatest depth., individual change in work through participation in small groups the organisation followed by resourcing the change. Individuals experienced high levels of involvement using dialogic discourse
Employee participation in Lean intervention housing said to be high for some low for others ], long serving staff had experienced frustration by a lack of control but the project teams enabled them to be involved unlike previous experiences. They were able to experiment with changes. However volunteers from front line services were viewed as separaOrganisational culture collaboration and change
How might we collaborate to enable and empower change?

Week 6 Collaboration and change
Recap Week 5 Stakeholders -Reflective action learning Plan Do Check Act –Sports entertainment & Forcefield analysis & World café a process for stakeholder consultation
Culture and Culture Mapping
Facilitation, collaboration building a network of organisations with third party change agent

Review
Wk 1 -How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Wk2 -Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Wk 3 -Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?
Wk4 -How, do we make sense of change and how do we respond to organisational change across the dimensions of cognition, affect and behaviour?
Wk 5-Why is it important to include perspectives of those people (stakeholders) who might be affected by the decision in the process of planning design and implementation of change?

Action learning and analysis of driving & resisting forces
PDCA
Force field

Week 6 focus question
How can a third-party change agent draw on a range of processes to facilitate collaborative change and embed a collaborative culture?
Applied to Wk 6 case
heatnetwork Crossover, St Margaret’s Community Trust, Somali Disability & Elderly Support Group, Comm-Pact, Worth Unlimited, Aim Higher Education Link and Our Community

Organisational Culture Textbook definitions
“A system of shared beliefs and values that guides behaviour ”
Wood et al. (2016)

“The soul of the organization”
Hellriegel & Slocum (2009)

Commonly known as…
“The way we do things around here.”

Schein’s 1990 definition
“(a) a pattern of basic assumptions,
(b) invented, discovered, or developed by a given group,
(c) as it learns to cope with its problems of external adaptation and internal integration,
(d) that has worked well enough to be considered valid and,
therefore
(e) is to be taught to new members as the
(f) correct way to perceive, think, and feel in relation to those problems.”

p.11

Our values: working at AUT

https://www.aut.ac.nz/about/careers-at-aut/working-at-aut/what-its-like-to-work-at-aut/our-values-working-at-aut

When you work at AUT you join a community of change makers who understand the positive impact education has on individuals, communities and society.
AUT is an aspirational place that attracts bright, positive and ambitious staff, and supports achievement.
Our values – tika, pono and aroha (integrity, respect and compassion) – are at the heart of everything we Review
Week 1 -How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Week 2 -Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Week 3 -Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?
Week 4 -How, do we make sense of change and how do we respond to organisational change across the dimensions of cognition, affect and behaviour?

Week 5 Focus Question
Why is it important to include perspectives of those people (stakeholders) who might be affected by the decision in the process of planning design and implementation of change?

Week 5 Stakeholders and Change
WHO? Types of Stakeholders
Organisational internal stakeholders/Individual stakeholders/External stakeholders
WHAT’s involved? Forcefield analysis:
What are the forces driving and restraining change?
Which stakeholders are driving/restraining change and why?
HOW to include stakeholders? World Café Exercise – Process of collaborative dialogue – Case: Fairfax Nine merger/acquisition Media Newspaper Change
Reflective Action Learning: Plan Do Check Act (PDCA) – Case: Sports & Entertainment Organization

Types of Stakeholders to consider when an organisation wants to make a change
EXTERNAL
Customers
Consumers
Suppliers
Government
Industry and professional associations
Media
Community, etc.
The environment

INTERNAL
Division, department, sub-department
Managers at different levels
People in specific roles
Demographic groupings:
Race, ethnicity
Gender, etc.

Individuals
Trade unions (also have an external component)

Types of Stakeholders in Change
These can be analysed in terms of
Events: e.g. earthquake, change in legislation, merger, new IT system
Trends: e.g. technology, social, economic
Stakeholders are usually organisations or broad groups, e.g. industry associations, consumers, suppliers, government, local residents.
Management of each ORGANISATION needs to identify WHO its stakeholders are when a change is planned.

Not all stakeholders are affected by a change in the same way – How to analyse and evaluate?

Analysis of Driving & Resisting Forces/
Action Learning
PDCA (Plan.Do.Check.Act)
Forcefield Analysis

Forcefield analysis (Lewin, 1947)
Identify the forces Driving and Restraining Change (internal + external)
Estimate how strong each force is.
Consider whether it is worthwhile proceeding with the change.
Consider how the restraining forces could be managed.

Forcefield Analysis by Lewin (1947)

*

Forcefield analysis
Forces driving change

Forces restraining change
Political, economic, social, technological factors
Competition
Reputation
Benefits Costs
(financial, reputational, etc.)

InteChange Engagement Process

Assessment 3 Marking Criteria

Name

Exemplary

Accomplished

Competent

Developing

Planned a relevant change engagement process for embedding change ATAG drawing from the aspects or problems Identified in assessment 2.

.

Designed and created a 5-6 slide power point presentation that:

1) communicated the planned change process, and

2) explained how it would be implemented

Applied evidence-based research from the course readings to the 5-6 slide power point presentation and referenced APA style.

.

This assessment measures the following learning goals:

1) Be self-aware critically reflective and ethical management professionals

2) Be effective thinkers and problem solvers

3) Be effective communicators

4) Be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of business management professional practices.I will not be able to release rubrics or marks for assessment 2 until Monday evening after finishing marking and moderation but the following  feedback from our marking of assessment 2 will help you prepare your slides if you are wanting to work on them over the weekend. 
The Assessment 3 requires you to: 
· plan a change engagement process ( how would you engage stakeholders at Anytown Art Gallery?)
· design and create a PowerPoint presentation (5-6 slides) that communicates a planned change process recommended from your findings in the case analysed in assessment 2 (which models and frameworks you would choose and how you would use them for the changes at Anytown Art Gallery) 
· apply concepts, theories, models and/ or frameworks from the required weekly readings listed on pg. 6 of the study guide.
The following suggestions are drawn from markers observations of  assessment 2 to help you: 
· most students identified and evaluated three aspects of the change process at Anytown Art Gallery (ATAG) 
· some students described the case and did not draw from the course readings those students will need to find models and processes from the readings to design their engagement plan
· most students applied concepts models and  frameworks  from the readings some searched the internet for resources which were not evidence based. You will need to apply  concepts models and  frameworks  from the course readings to assessment 3 in order to pass.
· assessment 3 requires you to plan and identify how you could manage the change engagement process at  ATAG in 5-6 slides
· you should show how you would engage stakeholders and manage the change process better than was done by Dr Daga in the ATAG case
· some students mentioned  concepts models and  frameworks  from the course readings but did not show understanding in assessment 2
· examine the aspects for improvement that you evaluated and demonstrate understanding of the processes or models you recommend for more effective change management 
· reference concepts models,  frameworks and processes that you suggest would be better approaches to embedding the changes at ATAG
· ensure that you read and understand the models frameworks or evidence based theories you reference from the required course readings under course resources or pg 6 of the study guideWeek 12

The expectations of the final assessment,
Identify common factors of successful framework’s and theories that underpin change and organisational development
Discuss how you could design the slides applying models

*

Wk 1 -How sound are the underlying theories, methods and ideas on change, that managers and consultants adhere to?
Wk2 -Why is it necessary to consider complex contexts and cross-cultural dimensions in organisations during change?
Wk 3 -Why and how do employees’ experiences of participation influence their perceptions and response to change, the effectiveness of organisational change and the success of the change?
Wk 4 -How, do we make sense of change and how do we respond to organisational change across the dimensions of cognition, affect and behaviour?
Wk 5-Why is it important to include perspectives of those people (stakeholders) who might be affected by the decision in the process of planning design and implementation of change?
Wk 6-How can a third-party change agent draw on a range of processes to facilitate collaborative change and embed a collaborative culture? The heatnetwork case
Wk 7 To What Extent Is Culture Change Possible Through Coaching and Mentoring?
Wk 8 What are the leadership and negotiation factors contributing to organisational change success or failure?
Wk 9 How organisational change has been embedded into organisations through Interest Based Negotiation (IBN) Case study Air New Zealand
Wk 10 Ethics justice and change: Good faith bargaining, trust and honest communication, constructs of justice embedding a new health and safety culture

Wk 11 What are the common EBOCD insights and lessons from the comparative analysis of 33 case histories presented in Hamlin, Ellinger & Jones, (2019).
Wk 12 : How might we embed change at ATAG – 5-6 PPT Slides.

Assessment 3
*

Due date Week 13

Weighting 20% individual

Type Power point presentation of a change process to executive decision makers

Length 5-6 Slides

Submission Turnitin

Requirements This assessment builds on your findings from assessment 2.
You are required to:
plan a change engagement process.
design and create a PowerPoint presentation (5-6 slides) that communicates a planned change process recommended from your findings in the case analysed in assessment 2
respond to the feedback provided by the marker of assessment 2
apply concepts, theories, models and/ or frameworks from the required weekly readings listed on pg. 6 of this study guide.

Programme learning goals Be self-aware critically reflective and ethical management professionals
Be effective thinkers and problem solvers
Be effective communicators
Be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of business management professional practices.

Paper learning outcomes Critically evaluate the complexity of organisational change from a range of perspectives
Examine and apply theories, concepts, and practices of leading and managing change in organisations
An463

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Chapter 27

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2.ch027

ABSTRACT

In response to environmental volatility, uncertainty, and change, seven not-for-profit organizations
decided to join forces to deliver more efficient and effective solutions to deeply rooted social and educa-
tional challenges in the city of Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom. From the perspective of
the change agent, this reflective case history explores the processes involved in developing the network
and the successes and challenges associated with its people and their ambitions for the future.

INTRODUCTION

Strength in Numbers

Against a backdrop of sweeping cuts to public spending, the demise of local services and a marked
increase in social upheaval, chief executive officers (CEOs) from 7 culturally and economically diverse
not-for-profit organisations based in Hodge Hill, Birmingham, UK, joined forces to protect community
assets and to find ‘network based’ solutions to deep rooted social and educational challenges. Champi-
oned by Birmingham City Council, and supported by local stakeholders, the idea behind heatnetwork
(Hodge Hill Enterprising Active and Transforming Network) was a simple one; through the combining of
organisational resources and capabilities, cost efficiencies would be achieved, local competition avoided,
and bargaining power strengthened when competing regionally and nationally for scarce resources to
support the 121,678 adults and children residing in one of England’s most deprived areas. In total, the
organisations that comprised heatnetwork (Crossover, St Margaret’s Community Trust, Somali Dis-
ability & Elderly Support Group, Comm:Pact, Worth Unlimited, Aim Higher Education Link and Our
Community) employed over 100 staff and engaged 250 volunteers to deliver more than 1000 activities
to three-quarters of the local population each year. In 2009, reported turnovers amounted to circa £3m

Strength in Numbers?
Shaping Collaboration During a

Period of Uncertainty and Change

Barry Joseph D’Souza
Walking Among Giants Limited, UK

464

Strength in Numbers?

(combined). Individually, each organisation was contributing significantly to neighbourhood manage-
ment and had achieved city-wide respect for positively impacting the areas of education and training,
employment, social care and youth and community regeneration. In 2010, with a great deal of good
will, and a renewed sense of optimism, a formal working agreement was signed, and the CEOs began
meeting fortnightly to plan and progress the work of heatnetwork.

When Reality Bites

No sooner had the network started meeting, then the bottom fell out from under the sector. Across the
nation funded organisations were losing financial support overnight. While some were having to dem-
onstrate immediate efficiencies for financing to continue, ot483

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Chapter 29

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2.ch029

ABSTRACT

This reflective case history illustrates the change process in a USA sports and entertainment’s theatre
organization led by its leader in consultation with a human resource development and organizational
change professional. Evidence-based organizational change and development informed by the theoretical
perspectives on shop floor management and action learning guided the change process conceptualized
on the belief that frontline employees should play a major role in driving change in organizations, and
their learning and reflection is crucial in this process.

INTRODUCTION

After acquiring full ownership of two movie theatres and conducting an initial environmental and busi-
ness scan, a large sports and entertainment organization based in the United States of America (USA)
determined that much of the economic viability of the movie theatres was contingent upon the success
of the theatres’ concessions where guests purchase popcorn, soda, candy, and other snacks. Data showed
that after subtracting film rental from gross box office sales, box office sales represented 49.8% of total
revenue while concessions generated 40.5% of the two theatres’ total revenue. Based on the aforemen-

Creating a Business Unit
Within a Large Sports and

Entertainment Organization’s
Theatre Operation:

Reflections on the Change Process

John Baaki
Old Dominion University, USA

Maria Cseh
The George Washington University, USA

484

Creating a Business Unit Within a Large Sports and Entertainment Organization’s Theatre Operation

tioned data, the environmental and business scan, and the sports and entertainment organizations’ experi-
ence from its other venues (e.g., major league baseball stadium, performance theatre, and multi-purpose
arena), the organization decided that, in order to maximize concessions revenue potential, the theatres
needed a self-contained concessions department. Each venue under the sports and entertainment orga-
nization’s umbrella had a self-contained concessions department that included a concessions manager
and frontline concessions leaders.

The self-contained concessions department required a significant change in the theatres’ organizational
structure and leadership, as the organization had no manager in place to oversee the concessions depart-
ment and no day-to-day floor supervisors to directly supervise each concessions location. Structurally,
the concessions department, as a potential business unit, did not have direct leadership at the frontline
where all customer-employee transactions and interaction occurred. This reorganization of the theatres’
concessions departments was considered unique in the movie theatre industry and caused much anxiety
amongst the employees of the theatre organization.

Description o361

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Chapter 18

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2.ch018

ABSTRACT

Resistance to change happens to be a phenomenon in which both the change agents and change recipients
are equally responsible for all forms of resistance. Resistance and its various forms are an outcome of
the change agents’ observations and their interpretations of the conversations, behavior, and reactions
of the change recipients. This chapter uses auto-ethnographic reflexive narratives of two change agents
involved in the self-assessment process at a college planning to seek US-based business program ac-
creditation to make sense of the change process. The purpose of this chapter is to emphasize the under-
reflected role of the change agents and how they influence and affect the behavior of change recipients
and thereby contribute towards employee resistance. The chapter also emphasizes the crucial role of
reflection and introspection in the sensemaking activities of the change agents in the entire change initia-
tive and thereby adds evidence-based organizational change and development initiatives in an academic
setting where research is limited.

Resistance to Organizational
Change in Academia:
A Case Study From Palestine

Investigating the Under-Reflected
Role of Change Agents

Devi Akella
Albany State University, USA

Grace Khoury
Birzeit Univeristy, Palestine

362

Resistance to Organizational Change in Academia

INTRODUCTION

Organizational change has become inevitable over the past few years. With globalization, competition,
strategic alignment, introduction of new management theories and models, organizations and their
employees are continuously being exposed to change in a variety of ways. Inspite of careful research
and planning by organizational leaders, change initiatives are a major source of concern. Usually orga-
nizational change and development (OCD) efforts and interventions have a tendency to produce failure
(Sorge & van Witteloostuijn, 2004). Resistance to change has been cited as the most common reason for
the failure of majority change initiatives (Erwin & Garman, 2009). However, resistance to a large extent
has been seen as a “psychological phenomenon located over there in the change recipients” (Anderson,
2016; Ford, Ford & D’Amelio, 2008, p.370) and “objectified as a socio-psychological phenomenon”
(Dent & Goldberg, 1999 as cited in Ijaz & Vitalist, 2011, p.119).

This has minimized the development of OCD tools and methodologies to increase the success of
change initiatives. Most of the efforts remain concentrated on showing change recipients “the error of
their ways by dealing with the misunderstandings, fears and apprehensions believed to underlie their
resistance” (Ford et al., 2008, p.370; Kulkarni, 2016), resulting in a lack of ‘evidence based’ organization
development tools which assWeek

Topic

Reading

1

Conceptualizing change management Personal experiences of change.

ten Have, W., Graamans, E., & ten Have, S. (2019). Reconsidering essentials of organization development: an evidence-based change management perspective. In R. Hamlin, Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based Initiatives for Organizational Change and Development (pp. 52-75). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225- 61552.chpts 1 & 3.

2

Complexity culture and change

Cseh, M., & Coningham, B. (2019). Culturally informed evidence- based organizational change and development through the lens of complexity theory. In R. Hamlin, A.
Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based Initiatives for Organizational Change and Development (pp. 140-154). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225- 6155-2.chpt 7.
Smollan, R. (2006) Minds, hearts and deeds: Cognitive, affective and behavioural response to change. Journal of Change Management, 6(2), 143-158.

3

Engaging support and commitment

Clarke, N., & Higgs, M. (2019). Employee participation in change programs. In R. Hamlin, A. Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence- Based Initiatives for Organizational Change and

Development (pp. 179-199). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225- 6155-2. chpt 9.

4

Resistance to change

Akella, D., & Khoury, G. (2019). Resistance to organizational change in academia: a case study from Palestine investigating the under-reflected role of change agents. In R. Hamlin, A. Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based Initiatives for
Organizational Change and Development (pp. 361-381). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2. chpt18.

5

Stakeholders and change

Baaki, J., & Cseh, M. (2019). Creating a business unit within a large sports and entertainment organization’s theatre operation: reflections on the change process. In R. Hamlin, A. Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based Initiatives for Organizational Change and Development (pp. 483-491). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155- 2.chpt 29.

6

Collaboration and change

D’Souza, B. J. (2019). Strength in numbers? shaping collaboration during a period of uncertainty and change. In R. Hamlin, A. Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based

Initiatives for Organizational Change and Development (pp. 463-471). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2.chpt 27.

7

Human resource change management

Garvey, R. (2019). To what extent is culture change possible through coaching and mentoring? In R. Hamlin, A. Ellinger, & J. Jones (Eds.), Evidence-Based Initiatives for

Organizational Change and Development (pp. 111-139). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6155-2.chpt 6.

8

Leading change

Jones, J., Firth, J., Hannibal, C., & Ogunseyin, M. (2019). Factors contributing to organizational change success or failure: a qualitative meta-analysis of 200 reflective case studi




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  • Will complete your papers in 6 hours
  • On-time Delivery
  • Money-back and Privacy guarantees
  • Unlimited Amendments upon request
  • Satisfaction guarantee

How it Works

  • Click on the “Place Order” tab at the top menu or “Order Now” icon at the bottom and a new page will appear with an order form to be filled.
  • Fill in your paper’s requirements in the "PAPER DETAILS" section.
  • Fill in your paper’s academic level, deadline, and the required number of pages from the drop-down menus.
  • Click “CREATE ACCOUNT & SIGN IN” to enter your registration details and get an account with us for record-keeping and then, click on “PROCEED TO CHECKOUT” at the bottom of the page.
  • From there, the payment sections will show, follow the guided payment process and your order will be available for our writing team to work on it.